October 21, 2012: I have decided to log my writing this year on my website — I will post the work here as PDFs. The chart above will show green on days I log my goal, and red on days I don’t quite make it. If you click on the calendar, it should take you to my NaNo page where the actual count I enter will be logged.

The purpose of NaNoWriMo is NOT to push out a perfect, finished novel in a single month. Rather, the idea is to write (and write, and write, and write) about 1700 words each day on average, without wasting too much time in self-editing or proofreading. The daily word count will include typos, mis-statements and “out-write” errors. Not because the writers don’t know better, but because the creative process is messy, recursive and spontaneous.

So the first draft, not even a rough draft really, is the brainstorm, the vomita fabrica of the creative mind. If you know Latin, feel free to offer suggestions on how else to express the idea of creativity explosively emerging from the mind!

When I teach, when I am talking about generating ideas with students, I start by explaining that we can’t know if an idea is “good” or “bad” at first, and that sometimes the most useful ideas come around because we think about and around ideas that are less useful. When we limit ourselves too quickly, we lose the opportunity to explore alternatives. What appears at first glance to be useless might, in another application or from a different perspective, become essential.

Thus, consider this my acknowledgement that the writing that will appear in this corner of my online life will be rough, raw, confusing, amateurish, and possibly just plain rotten. Hopefully, it will also be interesting and have potential.

Right now, I have several ideas floating around in my head. I don’t know which one I will settle down with, but hopefully it will be fun!