Finally, progress!

As I woke up earlier than normal, I had some time this morning to water the garden before I left for school. One week to go…

These are some of the sights that met my eyes on a Friday at 6:30 in early June.

Enjoy!

The pink rose that I brought from my parents' home soon after we moved in.  It did well enough in the front yard, but really seems to love the small well in the back patio.  Might have to divide it and give some away!
The pink rose that I brought from my parents’ home soon after we moved in. It did well enough in the front yard, but really seems to love the small well in the back patio. Might have to divide it and give some away!
The garden by the fish (tadpole) pond.  One dahlia is "up" in this area, the other seems more reluctant.  I think the astrantias are dead, but the meadow rue is lively and will be gorgeous when it blooms!  The tall feathery plant on the right is bronze fennel, which I am enjoying in that place for now.
The garden by the fish (tadpole) pond. One dahlia is “up” in this area, the other seems more reluctant. I think the astrantias are dead, but the meadow rue is lively and will be gorgeous when it blooms! The tall feathery plant on the right is bronze fennel, which I am enjoying in that place for now.
The front of the house gets better and better -- need to find a good spot for that spool and the bag of compost, and then I think we'll bring in some good soil and make an actual garden bed between the parking space and the porch.  Love having the time to dream...
The front of the house gets better and better — need to find a good spot for that spool and the bag of compost, and then I think we’ll bring in some good soil and make an actual garden bed between the parking space and the porch. Love having the time to dream…
The ceanothus, or California Lilac, now dwarfs the 5 foot-tall statue my grandfather made years ago.  The bees just adore this purply-blue cloud, and so do I.
The ceanothus, or California Lilac, now dwarfs the 5 foot-tall statue my grandfather made years ago. The bees just adore this purply-blue cloud, and so do I.
This rose is of mostly unknown origin -- my mother in law gave it to us when we moved in, an unlabeled rose from a nursery she visited.  It is the one that makes the lovely little pink nosegays most years.  This year I think the deer discouraged the multiple blooms so I shall be content with the larger single blooms we see here.
This rose is of mostly unknown origin — my mother in law gave it to us when we moved in, an unlabeled rose from a nursery she visited. It is the one that makes the lovely little pink nosegays most years. This year I think the deer discouraged the multiple blooms so I shall be content with the larger single blooms we see here.
The newest plants in the garden -- some volunteer kale, finocchio known as fennel bulb, and not quite visible are the extra carrots and radishes we planted.
The newest plants in the garden — some volunteer kale, finocchio known as fennel bulb, and not quite visible are the extra carrots and radishes we planted.

One last pic: the part of the garden that I sat near this afternoon and enjoyed looking at. The pumpkin has blossoms on it already!

Cold frame holds three sweet pepper plants, the slugs having pre-enjoyed the others and 6 tomato pots of three varieties.  The beautiful leafy greens toward the front are daikon radish, with carrots and celery planted in front and behind and a row of beets close to the cold frame.  The two white pipes each mark a small dill plant for pickles later in the summer.  And in the far bed peas are beginning to grow up old tomato cages while the rhubarb waits for someone to buy strawberries to go along with it.  Not seen are a few rows of beans and three potatoes that survived the slugs and were moved last weekend.
Cold frame holds three sweet pepper plants, the slugs having pre-enjoyed the others and 6 tomato pots of three varieties. The beautiful leafy greens toward the front are daikon radish, with carrots and celery planted in front and behind and a row of beets close to the cold frame. The two white pipes each mark a small dill plant for pickles later in the summer. And in the far bed peas are beginning to grow up old tomato cages while the rhubarb waits for someone to buy strawberries to go along with it. Not seen are a few rows of beans and three potatoes that survived the slugs and were moved last weekend.

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